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oldest hotels in America

5 of the Oldest Hotels in America

By Arkansas, Bus Travel, California, Cape May, Little Rock, New Jersey, San Diego

5 of the Oldest Hotels in America

Book Your Trip to a Historic Hotel Today

If you’re a history buff, it makes sense that you might want to visit some of the oldest sites and attractions in the country. But have you ever thought about booking a room at an old-world hotel? There are many such accommodations across the land, but some stand out for their age, nobility, and beauty. So where are the oldest hotels in America? Before you book your bus ticket, consider one of these locations for your stay.

Boston, MA

Few hotels enjoy as much national recognition and adoration as Omni Parker House in Boston, MA. The luxury property is the epitome of American history and hospitality: It opened its doors in 1855 and is considered the oldest hotel to operate continuously in the country. It was formerly known as the Parker House Hotel and has undergone significant renovations and changes over the decades. The property has hosted luminaries such as Mark Twain and Charles Dickens, who lived at the hotel for five months. It was here where he first performed “A Christmas Carol” before taking his performance to another local venue. It’s not without notoriety, either — John Wilkes Booth stayed here some eight days before assassinating President Abraham Lincoln. Many noteworthy individuals have worked for the property, too, including Ho Chi Minh, who was purportedly a baker there; Malcolm X, who was a busboy; and Emeril Lagasse, who was a sous chef in the late 1970s and early ’80s. The modern iteration is as beautiful and comfortable as ever; there are luxurious suites, a 24-hour fitness center, and a stylish restaurant renowned for — what else? — its Boston Cream Pie.

Washington, D.C.

There are many historic hotels situated in Washington, D.C. Many have hosted some of the world’s biggest names in the spheres of politics and entertainment. But the oldest continuously running property in the city is the Tabard Inn. It opened in 1922 and has long been an area institution renowned for its charming interiors and reflections of bygone eras. It played a significant role in American history, too, by housing the WAVES (Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service) during World War II. Under new ownership in the ’70s, the hotel stood out for the very things that made it so unusual in the hospitality field: the rooms had no TVs and the food was prepared from scratch, with nary a microwave in the building. It was a return to a calmer, more peaceful time for guests who sought refuge from the hustle and bustle of their daily lives. A commitment to outstanding service and an interest in retaining the old-world feeling remains alive even today. The rooms are beautifully furnished with elements like ornate headboards, lush drapes, and wooden furnishings. In keeping with its longstanding interest in preparing only the freshest meals, the on-site restaurant sources many of its ingredients locally and cooks everything to order.

San Diego, CA

Located in the Gaslamp Quarter, the Horton Grand, founded in 1886, is the oldest hotel in San Diego, CA. It was originally known as the Grand Hotel before it was renamed in 1907 as the Hotel Horton. Fast forward to 1981, when both the Hotel Horton and the Brooklyn-Kahle Saddlery hotels were set for demolition. Builders instead disassembled the hotels and moved both to their current location, where they reopened together in 1986. Many of each hotel’s original elements are still featured today, including stained glass windows from the Brooklyn-Kahle Saddlery and an ancient oak staircase from the Horton. It’s a formidable hotel with true historic standing in the city, and the Horton Grand continues to deliver just as much today as it ever did during its illustrious past. There’s an old-world quality about it that is unmatched, largely because so many of its historic details remain. Rooms are warm and inviting, while the on-site restaurant screams old-world ambiance from its ornate brass chandeliers to its rich wood trim.

Cape May, NJ

Our shortlist of oldest hotels in America must include the Chalfonte. If you’re in Cape May, NJ, you probably won’t be able to miss the bright green sign that sits before the Chalfonte. “National Historic Landmark,” it reads, along with the opening year: 1876. It was founded by Henry Sawyer, who was captured during the Civil War and sentenced to execution for shooting a pair of Confederate Calvary POWs. Sawyer’s wife implored President Abraham Lincoln to assist. If Sawyer was executed, warned his administration, then they would execute two Confederates in return — one of whom was General Robert E. Lee’s son. An agreement was hastily arranged, and Sawyer was freed before returning to war. When he returned home to Cape May, he shifted his focus to opening his property. As the oldest hotel along the shore and situated in a privileged spot two blocks from the water’s edge and downtown, the property is more than just a historic delight — although there are plenty of old-world trappings that will thrill anyone with an appreciation for yesteryear. Imagine rocking chairs on verandas and a distinctive cupola that sits atop the grand home like a crown. It’s all the charm you might expect to find in the south, complete with the kind of simplicity that guests favored during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The rooms are pleasant, simple, and relaxed, all providing beautiful views of the airy surroundings. There are no TVs or phones, but guests do have Internet access. It’s also worth noting that there’s no elevator in the building, so you will need to book a ground-floor room accordingly if you’re planning a trip and need special accommodations for accessibility.

Little Rock, AK

Often referred to as the “front porch of Little Rock,” the Capital Hotel opened in 1876. It has continuously made history for its groundbreaking introductions to the hospitality world, including electricity and oversized elevators. Many well-known figures have stayed here during its reign, including President Ulysses S. Grant — there’s even an old tale that claims the elevators were built so large to accommodate Grant’s horse! Bill Clinton also headquartered his media events here during his presidency. Over the years it has undergone numerous renovations and was fully restored in 2007. Today, it’s the epitome of southern charm: a true old-world hotel with contemporary touches that bring it up to date without taking away from what makes it truly historic and unique. You’ll feel this the moment you step beyond the iconic pillars that guard the double doors. Above, a trio of flags waves robustly, while a large deck beckons you to have a seat and enjoy a fresh meal and a cocktail. The rooms are at once warm and regal, with spectacular lighting that floods the rooms and brightens the rich wood furnishings.

Book Your Trip to a Historic Hotel Today

So where are the oldest hotels in America? They’re everywhere — if you look closely enough! If you’re inspired to indulge in a touch of history during your next getaway, head to BusTickets.com to book your trip today.

References

https://www.omnihotels.com/hotels/boston-parker-house

www.tabardinn.com

www.hortongrand.com

www.chalfonte.com

capitalhotel.com

There are beautiful small towns all over the U.S. Get out there and visit!

Quintessential Americana: 4 Small Towns Everyone Needs to Visit

By Arizona, Arkansas, Bus Travel, Kansas, Lindsborg, New Hampshire, Seligman

There’s nothing quite as refreshing as getting out of the busy city and exploring a quiet, welcoming small town. Fortunately, there are hundreds of nostalgic little communities scattered across the U.S. that offer the quintessential Americana experience. If you’re due for a much-needed escape, these are the four American small towns you should visit.

1. North Conway, New Hampshire

North Conway, NH is nestled next to the majestic White Mountain National Forest. With fewer than 2,500 residents, the quaint village’s scenic views are only enhanced by its impressive selection of charming shops, eateries, and inns — all of which are only a short walk from one another. Local Grocer is one of the community’s most iconic spaces. Serving as both a grocery store and eatery, you can grab snacks to go, meet the locals, or enjoy a full meal from their in-house deli and bakery. Or, head next door to the Table + Tonic for some handcrafted cocktails and farm-to-table grub.

When it comes to retail therapy, Downtown North Conway is the place to be. Stop by White Birch Books for an afternoon read, or hit up the Toy Chest for a unique selection of toys and games. Craving some outdoor time? Finish off your day with a hike out to Echo Lake State Park for a swim and a water-side picnic — just don’t forget to bring your camera to capture the spectacular views.

2. Eureka Springs, Arkansas

When it comes to charm, it’s hard to beat the streets of Eureka Springs, AR. Dating back to 1880, the quirky little town is only home to 1,200 permanent residents but attracts thousands of visitors each year — and for good reason. The community preserved the majority of the historic buildings in the area, creating a sense that you’re stepping back in time to a simpler way of life.

From conventional to eccentric, the city’s winding streets are lined with small, local businesses. To truly take it all in, explore on foot, popping in and out of shops as you go. While the artsy traveler won’t want to miss out on the J.A. Nelson Gallery or Wilson and Wilson Folk Art, collectors and shopping hobbyists will want to hit up Town Shop, Sonya’s, and Packrats Paradise. If your trip is so full that you can’t hit the streets, be sure to at least stop by the Eureka Market for a throwback mom and pop shopping experience.

As with all idyllic small American towns, Eureka Springs offers plenty of spooky ghost stories and folklore. If you’re up for a scare, head to the historic — and allegedly haunted — Crescent Hotel for a tour, followed by a walking tour through Downtown from Haunted Eureka Springs.

3. Seligman, Arizona

Located on historic Route 66, it’s hard to find a more nostalgic Americana location than Seligman, AZ. In fact, the community even served as the inspiration for Cars the movie. For that reason alone, it’s an American small town you should visit at least once in your lifetime.

In the mood to fill up your suitcase with memorabilia? Stop by the Route 66 Motorporium for some souvenirs, unique T-shirts, and custom artwork. Or, grab some memorable gifts for friends and family at the Rusty Bolt Gift Shop. For food, hit one of the many retro eateries in town for burgers, fries, and a shake, such as J&R Mini Mart and Cafe or the Snow Cap Drive-In. If you visit in spring, be sure to schedule your trip around the Route 66 Fun Run. The three-day event features a parade of hundreds of classic vehicles cruising from Seligman to Kingman.

4. Lindsborg, Kansas

While Lindsborg, KS may have a strong Swedish heritage, it’s a quintessential small American town dedicated to hard work, tradition, and community. One of the biggest draws of the town is its biennial Svensk Hyllningsfest, which is held in October. The event celebrates the city’s original Swedish settlers with food, exhibits, live music, vendors, and traditional dances.

If you can’t make the festival, there’s still plenty to see and do. The Birger Sandzén Memorial Art Gallery features works by the famed artist of its namesake as well as contemporary creators, while the Red Barn Studio Museum focuses on pieces from beloved local artist Lester Raymer. Up for a trek? Head outside of town to the Coronado Heights Castle.

Save on Your Small-Town America Getaway With BusTickets.com

Now that you know which American small towns you should visit, the biggest challenge is choosing just one. Luckily, with BusTickets.com, you don’t have to miss out on unforgettable adventures. Our price comparison tool allows you to always find the best rates so that you can travel more and stress less. Your quintessential American getaway awaits — book your bus tickets today!

A beautiful road opens up to a tunnel covered by lush fall trees. The perfect road trip destination for fall lovers.

5 Breathtaking Travel Destinations to Welcome the Fall Season

By Alaska, Arkansas, Asheville, Bus Travel, Camden, Conneticut, Eureka Springs, Maine, North Carolina, Torrington, Vermont, Woodstock

From beach vacations to camping trips, summer gets a lot of attention. Yet, there are many travelers who spend the entire season counting down the days until fall. If you can’t get changing leaves and crisp, cool mornings out of your head, you’re not alone. Here are the five best travel destinations for fall lovers.

1. Camden, Maine

No other region of the country quite nails gorgeous autumn foliage like New England, and Camden, ME is one of the best spots to view it. Bask in a foliage sea of vibrant reds, oranges, and yellows with a trek through Camden Hills State Park. The park spans over 5,700 acres, all of which is explorable by hiking the area’s many trails. While the observation point on Mount Battie provides exceptional views of the bay, the sweat-inducing climb up Mount Megunticook offers the most picturesque reward, as it’s the highest peak in the area.

If you prefer water views, take a boat tour from Camden Harbor along the tree-lined coast or go kayaking on Megunticook Lake, which is surrounded by woodlands. However, you don’t need to venture far from the village for spectacular autumn views. The Penobscot Bay town’s High Street Historic District offers the ideal combination of eye-catching architecture and beautiful local foliage. Finish off your village stroll with a fresh plate of seafood served alongside impeccable views at Peter Ott’s on the Water.

2. Asheville, North Carolina

Fall in Asheville, NC comes slightly later than in the northeast, but when it does arrive, it’s sure to take your breath away. Even though it’s a metropolitan area, the city is surrounded by the Blue Ridge Mountains, which are covered in a forest. After a long, hot summer, there’s no better way to welcome in fall than immersing yourself in the Pisgah National Forest. Covering over half a million acres, the forest offers numerous opportunities for hiking, fishing, biking, and picnics. Outdoor enthusiasts also have the option to camp.

If you prefer a more tame adventure, head to The North Carolina Arboretum. The botanical garden spans 434 acres with manicured trees, gardens, and well-groomed walking and biking trails. The site also offers guided garden and trail walks weekly, as well as ArborEvenings every Thursday, which features live music, local drinks, and food. For a similar experience, tour the Biltmore Estate’s lavish iconic gardens, followed by a tasting at the on-site winery.

3. Eureka Springs, Arkansas

The Ozark Mountains’ natural beauty attracts visitors year-round. Yet, the hillsides truly come to life in late September when cooler weather arrives, making it one of the best travel destinations for fall lovers. Since Eureka Springs, AR is considered the heart of the Arkansas Ozarks, it’s the perfect spot to enjoy the changing seasons.

The steep hills throughout Eureka Springs provide fantastic views of the area, so you don’t even have to leave town to enjoy yourself. For the best visibility in town, grab a coffee at Eureka Daily Roast and take a stroll through Downtown. For a more in-depth nature experience, view the woods from above thanks to the Ozark Mountain Ziplines, or rent a kayak and head out to Lake Leatherwood City Park.

4. Woodstock, Vermont

If there’s any possible way to enhance the appearance of fall foliage, it’s achieved by adding covered wooden bridges, gently rolling hills, and historic architecture. Luckily, Woodstock, VT is home to all three. The quaint town offers a stunning landscape, which is made incredibly apparent at Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historic Park. The park offers multiple walking trails — surrounded by spectacular trees, shrubs, and flowering plants — that cross the Middle Covered Bridge and lead to the historic Carriage Barn. Tickets for the ranger-led programs are available with bundled admission to the Billings Farm and Museum.

5. Torrington, Connecticut

Fall in Torrington, CT peaks in mid-October and offers around a month of mesmerizing views. Nearby Paugnut State Forest is a must-see location, offering over 1,700 acres and various trails. For an unforgettable look at the Litchfield County countryside in fall, hike up Walnut Mountain, which is the Torrington’s highest point. If you want to take your viewing experience up a notch, book a hot air balloon ride over the county.

Find the Best Deals on Fall Bus Travel With BusTickets.com

Want to immerse yourself in autumn foliage but worried about your budget? Booking a trip to one of the best travel destinations for fall lovers doesn’t have to break the bank. The handy price comparison tool at BusTickets.com allows you to compare ticket rates instantly in real-time. Simply choose your destination, compare rates, and book the most affordable trip — it’s really that easy. Don’t let fall pass you by — buy your bus tickets today!

References

https://www.maine.gov/cgi-bin/online/doc/parksearch/details.pl?park_id=14

Home

https://www.fs.usda.gov/recarea/nfsnc/recarea/?recid=48114

Homepage
Home

http://eurekaspringsdowntown.com/

http://www.ziplineeurekasprings.com/

http://eurekaparks.com/

https://www.nps.gov/mabi/index.htm

https://billingsfarm.org/

https://www.ct.gov/deep/cwp/view.asp?a=2716&q=435626&deepNav_GID=1650

A Photo of One of the Creepiest Ghost Towns in America.

5 Creepy American Ghost Towns You Have to Visit

By Arizona, Arkansas, Bodie, Bus Travel, Colorado, Goldfield, Nevada, Rhyolite, Santa Claus, St.Elmo

In a country known for its magnificent historic sites and natural wonders, you may not even consider its many ghost towns. The United States, however, is packed with desolate cities that have seen better days. Once-bustling communities dwindled when residents abandoned them in the aftermath of the Gold Rush. The beauty of these haunting towns is that they remain fairly unscathed today — and while a few residents might be found in a few of the creepiest ghost towns in America, they’re largely abandoned. Here are five to consider for your next getaway.

1. Santa Claus, AZ

One wouldn’t imagine a town that shares a name with jolly Saint Nick to be so lacking in festive elements, but then Santa Claus is no ordinary town. The Arizona spot was developed in 1937 by a realtor whose goal was to create a lively resort town. True to its name, the holiday-themed locale drew visitors from far and wide for a few years. There were cute Christmas-themed properties galore, including the beloved Santa Claus Inn with a popular restaurant, but by far, the most well-known feature was the post office. It was the one place where kids could send mail to “Santa Claus”! Over time, though, its popularity diminished, and by the 1970s its heyday was well behind it. The once-brilliant likenesses of Mr. Claus himself, the formerly twinkling lights, and the pretty ornaments all faded, and today the town barely hints at its festive past. Some buildings are padlocked, others vandalized, many graffitied. You feel a sense of prickly unease as you wander the now uninhabited town whose streets and quaint buildings once rang with laughter!

2. St. Elmo, CO

The derelict remains of St. Elmo, CO, don’t look especially impressive at first glance. You have to remember, though, that this is one of the creepiest ghost towns in America. It was founded in 1880 and swiftly drew thousands of people thanks to its gold and silver mining opportunities. It was a truly vibrant, active town complete with a school, saloons, hotels, and a general store. But as the mining industry slowed, people quickly escaped town in search of other opportunities. By the 1950s, it was almost completely abandoned. That hasn’t stopped curious travelers from stopping through town, however, and if you’re so inclined you can even rent a cabin for a night — or for under $500 for a full week! The facilities can hold up to three people, and they’re suitably rustic and perfectly in keeping with what you might expect of a residence in a rather isolated town. Don’t forget to stop by the still-open general store for a snack or an antique souvenir to take home with you.

3. Bodie, CA

Once upon a time, Bodie, CA, was home to some 10,000 people. As is the case with many other ghost towns in the country, it experienced its boom during the California Gold Rush. By the late 19th century, there were more than 60 saloons in the town — but as gold supplies dwindled and mines closed, people followed suit. By the early 1940s, it was but a shadow of its former self. The beauty of Bodie, however, is that it’s remarkably well preserved. It’s a National Historic Site and is considered preserved under “arrested decay.” The term accurately describes the more than 170 buildings that still line Bodie’s streets. Although officials will not restore these properties to their former glory, the town will never fall into a state of disrepair either thanks to protections provided by the state. That’s largely why it’s so popular with tourists — and while you aren’t permitted inside the homes or the still-standing church, you can take a tour of the stamp mill and observe many of the relics that remain in the exact same place that they were left decades ago. Eerie, indeed.

4. Rhyolite, NV

Among the most popular ghost towns in Nevada is Rhyolite. It was founded in 1904 when it became a hotbed for enthusiastic miners who transformed it into a highly active and prosperous town. One of its most noteworthy features is a building constructed of 30,000 champagne, beer, and whiskey bottles. Due to the high price of labor and materials, it was far easier for builders to create dependable structures with bottles, which were readily available. Although it reached a point of disrepair during the 1920s, it was renovated for use on film sets several decades later. You can see remnants of the town’s former three-story bank, general store, and train station — and even wander inside some of them if you’re so inclined.

5. Goldfield, AZ

If you want to enjoy a more interactive ghost town, pay a visit to Goldfield, AZ. As one of the creepiest ghost towns in America, it boasts a fascinating history and a few ghosts to go along with it. It found glory in 1892 when gold mining was at its peak. Naturally, the supply dwindled eventually, and slowly everyone left town. Arizona’s acting governor, George Young, revived it briefly, but by the 1920s, the town was essentially abandoned for good. Today, it enjoys prestige as the only real ghost town in the Valley of the Sun. There’s plenty to do here, whether you want to take a walk down Main Street or pay a visit to the Goldfield Superstition Museum to learn more about the area’s background. The majority of buildings that stand are recreated, so it’s more of a tourist spot than some of the other ghost towns you might consider.

Book Your Ghost Town Getaway Today

If you’re ready to take a vacation of an entirely different kind, head straight to BusTickets.com to book your ghost town getaway today. You’ll make memories to last a lifetime while enjoying a taste of what life was like in bygone eras.

References

https://www.arizonahighways.com/blog/santa-claus-arizona-brief-history

http://www.st-elmo.com/

http://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=509

http://www.lovethesepics.com/tag/arrested-decay/

https://www.ghosttowns.com/states/nv/rhyolite.html

Book a bus trip and enjoy a midweek relaxation.

4 Mid-Week Bus Trips to Relax & Unwind

By Arkansas, Bus Travel, Chester, Eureka Springs, Hood River, Kalispell, Montana, Oregon, Vermont

Mondays are nearly always a challenge, but sometimes, the weekend is just too far away to make up for your current level of fatigue and stress buildup. Fortunately, avoiding complete career and life burn-out is as simple as booking a few days away to unwind and recharge. If you’re in dire need of a mid-week trip to relax, here are four destinations sure to hit the mark.

1. Eureka Springs, Arkansas

When you need a break from the hustle and bustle of everyday life, put a bus trip to Eureka Springs at the top of your list. The beloved tourist destination is nestled in the Ozark Mountains and known for its welcoming, laid-back attitude — making it an ideal location to unplug and unwind.

For lodging, there are a variety of historic bed and breakfasts and hotels in the city offering charming aesthetics ideal for mid-week rejuvenation, like the Heartstone Inn Bed and Breakfast and the Red Bud Manor Inn. If your ideal accommodation is getting up close and personal with nature, the Eureka Springs Treehouses offers themed elevated cabins immersed in the woods, along with underground Hobbit Caves and cottages.

Once you’re settled in, grab brunch and a cup of coffee at the Mud Street Cafe before getting to know Eureka Springs better with a relaxing guided tram tour through the town. The event takes around 90 minutes with stops at the historic Crescent Hotel and Grotto Spring — two must-see attractions in the area. After seeing what the town offers above, take a look below with an underground walking tour. Finish up with your day of adventure with dinner and drinks at Grotto Wood-Fired Grill and Wine Cave.

2. Hood River, Oregon

Hood River is the ideal bus travel getaway for nature enthusiasts. De-stress amongst the majestic scenery of the Cascade Range the Columbia River Gorge. Grab gear from one of the local rental shops and de-stress with a day on one of the area’s many hiking and biking trails. If you’re more of a water person, enjoy the private beach and numerous water sports offered by Hood River Waterplay at the Gorge.

Once your endorphins are up, grab some delicious treats at Kickstand Coffee and Kitchen before exploring the historic shops and galleries in downtown Hood River. The area is also home to a variety of distilleries, wineries, and cideries, the latter of which is a growing trend in the region. For spirits, stop by the Camp 1805 Distillery tasting room for a meal and drinks, or hit up Pfriem Family Brewers for local artisanal beers. Cider fans, on the other hand, won’t want to miss the locally crafted offerings at Fox-Tail Cider and Distillery.

3. Chester, Vermont

In the Northeast, there’s no better location for a mid-week trip to relax than Vermont. With a population just over 3,000, Chester is a quaint and quiet destination filled with friendly locals and Instagrammable architecture. Along with your bus tickets, book a spot at one of the idyllic historic inns, such as the Inn Victoria or the Stone Hearth Inn and Tavern.

Relax your mind and loosen up your muscles with a morning trek in or around the town. Take a self-guided walking tour to view the many historic buildings in the area, or enjoy a hike on the Lost Mine and Green Mountain trails. The trails are fairly easy to navigate and ideal for both beginners and fitness fanatics that simply need a calm, de-stressing walk.

After working up an appetite, grab brunch at The Free Range, which is located in a Victorian-era home dating back to 1895. Try the Cinnamon Roll French Toast, Bagel Gravlax Sandwich, or the Hash Bowl, along with one of their brunch cocktails. Next, hit up The Chester Bookworm followed by the Phoenix Books Misty Valley to find a new book. Finish off your day with dinner and drinks at MacLaomainn’s Scottish Pub for authentic Scottish fare.

4. Kalispell, Montana

If you’re looking for a great escape from big city life, then Kalispell offers the ideal setting for your mid-week break. The downtown district offers eateries, landmarks, and historic architecture — some even dating back as far as 1891. Built in 1912, the Kalispell Grand Hotel offers grandiose ambiance with an in-house massage studio and art gallery. Just down the street, guests can enjoy old-world treats at Norm’s Soda Fountain and world-renowned pizza at Moose’s Saloon. When it’s time to quench your thirst, hit up the taproom at the Kalispell Brewing Company.

Booking bus tickets to Kalispell also puts you in prime position to explore the best of Flathead Valley. Spend an unforgettable day kayaking or boating at Flathead Lake or hiking in Glacier National Park, both of which are a quick drive from Kalispell. The national park also offers a variety of guided walking and bus tours, as well as water excursions on St. Mary’s Lake.

Book Your Mid-Week Getaway Today

Ready to escape for a few days? Booking a mid-week trip to relax is fast, convenient, and affordable at BusTickets.com. From Eureka Springs to Kalispell, our platform offers instant access to thousands of destinations across the U.S. Not only can you buy your bus tickets or request a charter bus quote in minutes, but you also have the opportunity to compare prices across multiple carriers. Your adventure is only a click away — buy your bus tickets today.