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There are beautiful small towns all over the U.S. Get out there and visit!

Quintessential Americana: 4 Small Towns Everyone Needs to Visit

By Arizona, Arkansas, Bus Travel, Kansas, Lindsborg, New Hampshire, Seligman

There’s nothing quite as refreshing as getting out of the busy city and exploring a quiet, welcoming small town. Fortunately, there are hundreds of nostalgic little communities scattered across the U.S. that offer the quintessential Americana experience. If you’re due for a much-needed escape, these are the four American small towns you should visit.

1. North Conway, New Hampshire

North Conway, NH is nestled next to the majestic White Mountain National Forest. With fewer than 2,500 residents, the quaint village’s scenic views are only enhanced by its impressive selection of charming shops, eateries, and inns — all of which are only a short walk from one another. Local Grocer is one of the community’s most iconic spaces. Serving as both a grocery store and eatery, you can grab snacks to go, meet the locals, or enjoy a full meal from their in-house deli and bakery. Or, head next door to the Table + Tonic for some handcrafted cocktails and farm-to-table grub.

When it comes to retail therapy, Downtown North Conway is the place to be. Stop by White Birch Books for an afternoon read, or hit up the Toy Chest for a unique selection of toys and games. Craving some outdoor time? Finish off your day with a hike out to Echo Lake State Park for a swim and a water-side picnic — just don’t forget to bring your camera to capture the spectacular views.

2. Eureka Springs, Arkansas

When it comes to charm, it’s hard to beat the streets of Eureka Springs, AR. Dating back to 1880, the quirky little town is only home to 1,200 permanent residents but attracts thousands of visitors each year — and for good reason. The community preserved the majority of the historic buildings in the area, creating a sense that you’re stepping back in time to a simpler way of life.

From conventional to eccentric, the city’s winding streets are lined with small, local businesses. To truly take it all in, explore on foot, popping in and out of shops as you go. While the artsy traveler won’t want to miss out on the J.A. Nelson Gallery or Wilson and Wilson Folk Art, collectors and shopping hobbyists will want to hit up Town Shop, Sonya’s, and Packrats Paradise. If your trip is so full that you can’t hit the streets, be sure to at least stop by the Eureka Market for a throwback mom and pop shopping experience.

As with all idyllic small American towns, Eureka Springs offers plenty of spooky ghost stories and folklore. If you’re up for a scare, head to the historic — and allegedly haunted — Crescent Hotel for a tour, followed by a walking tour through Downtown from Haunted Eureka Springs.

3. Seligman, Arizona

Located on historic Route 66, it’s hard to find a more nostalgic Americana location than Seligman, AZ. In fact, the community even served as the inspiration for Cars the movie. For that reason alone, it’s an American small town you should visit at least once in your lifetime.

In the mood to fill up your suitcase with memorabilia? Stop by the Route 66 Motorporium for some souvenirs, unique T-shirts, and custom artwork. Or, grab some memorable gifts for friends and family at the Rusty Bolt Gift Shop. For food, hit one of the many retro eateries in town for burgers, fries, and a shake, such as J&R Mini Mart and Cafe or the Snow Cap Drive-In. If you visit in spring, be sure to schedule your trip around the Route 66 Fun Run. The three-day event features a parade of hundreds of classic vehicles cruising from Seligman to Kingman.

4. Lindsborg, Kansas

While Lindsborg, KS may have a strong Swedish heritage, it’s a quintessential small American town dedicated to hard work, tradition, and community. One of the biggest draws of the town is its biennial Svensk Hyllningsfest, which is held in October. The event celebrates the city’s original Swedish settlers with food, exhibits, live music, vendors, and traditional dances.

If you can’t make the festival, there’s still plenty to see and do. The Birger Sandzén Memorial Art Gallery features works by the famed artist of its namesake as well as contemporary creators, while the Red Barn Studio Museum focuses on pieces from beloved local artist Lester Raymer. Up for a trek? Head outside of town to the Coronado Heights Castle.

Save on Your Small-Town America Getaway With BusTickets.com

Now that you know which American small towns you should visit, the biggest challenge is choosing just one. Luckily, with BusTickets.com, you don’t have to miss out on unforgettable adventures. Our price comparison tool allows you to always find the best rates so that you can travel more and stress less. Your quintessential American getaway awaits — book your bus tickets today!

There is immense beauty in history. Check out the oldest buildings in the U.S and book a bus ticket to visit them.

5 of the Oldest Buildings in the United States

By Bus Travel, Dedham, Massachusetts, South Carolina, Tenessee, Washington D.C

You don’t have to search too intently to find beauty in every corner of the United States. There are thousands upon thousands of stunning structures — some new, but most deeply entrenched in history. Some of the oldest buildings in the U.S. also happen to be the most visually appealing. Here are five worth visiting on your next vacation.

1. The Carter Mansion

In addition to its distinction as the oldest frame house still in existence in Tennessee, the Carter Mansion also boasts an impressive history. It was built between 1775 and 1780 by John Carter and his son, Landon. Carter was one of the first to make a home in the wild country after Daniel Boone blazed the historic Wilderness Road through the Cumberland Gap in the Appalachian Mountains. Situated in Elizabethton, the home is unique for its well-preserved interior. The authentic elements, including intricate crown molding, chair rails, and elevated wall panels, are all representative of a bygone era. The property is also home to a pair of the oldest paintings in the entire state. Visitors can experience the Carter Mansion in all of its glory during different times of the year. A significant highlight is Christmas at the Carter Mansion, an annual event that allows visitors the chance to go “back in time” for a festive weekend.

2. Old Stone House

Although Washington, D.C., is filled with historic buildings that date back centuries, the oldest untouched building is the Old Stone House. Situated in Georgetown, the property was built in 1766 and originally served as both a residence and a cabinet maker’s shop. It has gone through numerous iterations since then and was restored in the 1950s by the National Park Service. By 1960, it was a residential museum where visitors could glimpse an array of pre-Revolutionary era furnishings and designs. It’s also listed on the National Register of Historic Places, and visitors are welcome to view the bedrooms, parlor, and kitchen.

3. Middleburg Plantation

Designed in 1697, the Middleburg Plantation in Huger, SC, is a magnificent representation of life at the time. As one of the oldest buildings in the U.S., it has been completely restored and is considered one of the oldest frame homes in the state. It contains its original heart pine floors, and of particular note are the carvings found on a window in an upstairs bedroom. They were produced by a little girl who lived in the home from 1892 to 1902 and remains there today. Located some 30 miles from downtown Charleston, it’s in a privileged location for visitors who want to venture out of the city and explore local history in-depth. Even its garden is reputable — it’s considered the oldest in the entire country.

4. Richard Jackson House

As the oldest wood frame home in New Hampshire, the Richard Jackson House earns its historic reputation easily. It was crafted in 1664 by Jackson himself, a farmer whose family owned the 25-acre land on which it sits, just across the Piscataqua River. It’s noteworthy largely for its extensive use of wood. The exterior was made with sawn lumber, while old-world English framing construction lends the majority of the home a deeply classical appearance. The property was restored in the early 20th century, and it was listed as a National Historic Landmark in 1968. Today, it’s a busy museum that regularly hosts special events.

5. Fairbanks House

Situated in Dedham, MA, Fairbanks House may well be the oldest timber-frame house in the entire country. It was constructed in 1636 by Jonathan Fairbanks, who lived there with his wife and six children. Indeed, “family” was the keyword — the home remained a Fairbanks property for eight generations. Today, the property is well preserved and owned by the Fairbanks Family in America, a nonprofit whose mission is to protect the ancestral home and its remarkably well-kept interior. It’s also a museum and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Book Your Bus Trip Today

If you’re inspired to delve a little deeper into the oldest buildings in the U.S., then it’s worth booking a getaway this summer and exploring these beautifully restored and preserved properties. Visit BusTickets.com to get started and to find affordable tickets to the destination of your choice!

References:

www.cartercountyhistory.com/the-mansion.html

www.nps.gov/places/old-stone-house.htm

middleburgplantationsc.com/

www.historicnewengland.org/property/jackson-house/

fairbankshouse.org/

fairbankshouse.org/